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Stunted By Reality Just another know-it-all talking about life, business, technology, sports and music.

24Apr/14Off

Taking orders should not be a problem for entrepreneurs

I was once in a conversation with an army officer who managed to form a pretty accurate assessment of the type of person that I am (entrepreneurial, full of ideas) without me having actually mentioned what I do.

So he asked me if I would ever work in a corporation, to which I replied that I would and that I had previously done that. Thinking about it later I realised that his question was more about whether or not I have a problem taking orders and if that would stop me working for someone else. That is to say, if you're entrepreneurial are you capable of working for other people?

It's a very interesting question which I thought about last week when Pascal Finette over at The Heretic wrote a post about encouraging more people to become entrepreneurs.

..many of our brightest students all around the world choose instead the perceived "safe" path of employment at Big Corp.

Even as an entrepreneurial person myself I don't think that starting your own business is a necessary requirement to being an entrepreneur. The mindset and method is more important than the title of founder. Google and Tesco both owe a great deal of their early success to two people who did not found the companies. I would class Eric Schmidt and Terry Leahy as great examples of entrepreneurs (or business people).

That is the reason why I answered to my officer friend that "no I do not have a problem taking orders". What I have a problem with is taking orders to advance a cause (or company) that I don't believe in.

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